January 2, 2014

Permissions and Wishes

Back in November, C.L. Fornari wrote a post on her blog Whole Life Gardening that made me smile. It's about persimmons and permission and mixing them up and the idea of a Permission Tree. Go read it now, and then you can come back here and I'll tell you why I loved it so. 

Did you read it?  Good. 

I enjoyed her post at first because I thought it really was about persimmon trees. 

I like to read about trees that I grow, and I have planted three persimmon trees in the meadow behind my house. They are Diospyros virginiana, a native tree that produces interesting orange fruits. My trees are still so little that all I can do is read about others and dream.
That lighted yellow tree in the center distance on the hillside is a young persimmon
that I brought home from Kentucky in my carryon luggage, stuffed under the airline seat.

I liked her post because when she pictured a possible Permission Tree, she thought of the real Wishing Tree at Berkshire Botanical Garden in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 

I have seen that tree, festooned with the wishes of many children. Here it was the day we visited:


And I laughed reading her post because I too confused the words persimmon and permission. The brain is only so nimble and mine is aging.

But her idea of a Permission Tree captured my imagination. Couldn't we all use one?

I like how C.L. describes a wise old tree that would listen to us, counsel us, and dispense or withhold permission to do the things we are thinking about doing. How valuable that could be.

And of course the Permission Tree has to be a persimmon. 

Will mine ever be big enough to do the job?
"You want to do what?" 

22 comments:

  1. I had never heard of the Wishing Tree before, but I like the idea of both a "wishing" and a "permission" tree. I could certainly use a sounding board and some sage advice at times, not only for gardening but for other matters as well:) I always think of my husband's aunt, who passed away just a month ago at the age of 95, when I think of persimmons. She made the most delicious persimmon pudding every year! Wish I had gotten her recipe and I would have shared it with you when your little tree is ready.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rose, it's going to be a long time before my trees give me persimmons that I could cook with. The Japanese varieties bear large fruit early. My native ones may take a while!

      Delete
  2. Preunite persimmons and permission would perhaps permit persimmons to give permission then persimmons can prevail. whew... what a thought. I love persimmons.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes it will be! And I just so love the thought of a tree holding a spot for wishes to blow in the wind! That is completely fantastic! Trees are so powerful and you have the most amazing species!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nicole, I also love the thought of trees having special capabilities to help us : )

      Delete
  4. You are so lucky to be able to grow persimmons and what a beautiful tree it makes. I would love a Persimmon Tree but they won't grow here. I would also love a Permission Tree that would give me permission to go and buy more plants. And a Wishing Tree, what a wonderful thought!
    Chloris

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chloris, I am hoping my Persimmon / Permission Tree only grants me what I want to do. I don't want it to tell me no!

      Delete
  5. Yet another gorgeous variety of tree you've managed to cultivate. You've accumulated some very fine specimens, adding a wishing/permission tree seems a natural progression :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marguerite, I think the natural progression of tree planting here should include a Money Tree next, and then a Tree of Youth, don't you think?

      Delete
  6. Do you need to ask permission from your persimmon? Happy New Year Laurrie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patty, I am hoping my little tree always gives me permission to do what I want : )

      Delete
  7. I am amazed at the golden fall color of your persimmon. The ones here tend to turn purple (purplish) instead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sweetbay, the little persimmon has a golden yellow-orange fall color that was fiery bright even when it was a tiny sapling. It's one of the bright spots of autumn here. I didn't realize they turn purple in some places.

      Delete
  8. Laurrie, I like the idea of your persimmon tree giving you permission to enjoy its fruit, once it grows some. Your post brought the children's book The Giving Tree to mind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joene, of course-- I hadn't thought about The Giving Tree!

      Delete
  9. My Permission Tree would need to be huge enough to have long branches that would reach out and grab me when I ignored the advice I'd been given. But I do love the idea. :o) (Of advice, not being grabbed.) I don't think you need permission from any of the trees in your arboretum. You've been doing fine all on your own. :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammy, thanks! I think I do need permission to plant any more trees, as I have run out of room and have everything planted too closely. Someone, or something needs to restrain me.

      Delete
  10. Indeed a tree that gives us permission...perhaps they are already among us!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donna, I think they are among us, listening!

      Delete
  11. What fun, Laurrie, the post and the idea of a permission tree. Too, it reminds me I need a persimmon. I will *take* permission to get a big 'un in order to get fruit fast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, for fast fruit production (and big juicy persimmons) you will need to plant one of the beautiful Japanese varieties. It will be a long time before my native Diospyros virginiana sets any fruit.

      Delete

Sorry about requiring code verification -- I experimented with turning it off to make commenting easier, and I got too much spam. Thanks for taking the time to comment, and to type in silly codes. I appreciate hearing from you.